Cumming City Council Receives Routine Financial Audit Report | Forsyth News

CUMMING, Ga. — The Cumming City Council received a healthy balance sheet in its annual financial audit report presented by the independent Rushton Group at the May 3 council meeting.

The audit took a close look at the city’s finances from 2021 and looked for errors or inaccuracies in the city’s financial reports. It also reviewed the city’s revenue and expenditure streams throughout 2021. The process took place over the past four weeks, and the final report was approximately 80 pages.

The report found that the majority of the city’s revenue comes in the form of sales taxes and fees for municipal services, each accounting for about a third of the city’s revenue. Property taxes accounted for just 1% of city revenue, while other taxes and capital grants each accounted for 14%.

The largest share of city spending in 2021 – 40% – went to culture and recreation. A quarter went to public works, while 18% went to public safety.

The report compared the city’s revenue and expenditure between 2020 and 2021 and found that its revenue surplus had increased over the past year. City revenue increased by more than $8 million in 2021 to $54.7 million. Spending increased by less than $2 million, totaling $39.1 million in 2021.






Cumming City Council members discuss the purchase of two vans for the city’s utility service on May 3.




The city’s net capital assets increased by more than $46 million between 2020 and 2021, with the report noting that recreation projects, the downtown project and improvements to the water and sewer system are the main contributors.

Clay Pilgrim, a representative for the Rushton Group, said the audit process went smoothly, with all finance staff and city department heads working well with the auditors.

During the meeting, the city council also approved the purchase of two city utility pickup trucks and two police interceptor SUVs, totaling approximately $140,000.

Council members also approved the purchase of a sewer line rapid assessment tool – which staff called a “SEwer RAT” – for $28,000. The tool is used to detect blockages in sewer lines, which is normally done by running a camera down the pipe to manually scan for blockages.

Staff said that by using the tool, they could avoid having to use a sewer line camera unless the tool detects a blockage.

Reach Jake Drukman at 770-847-8334. Follow him on Twitter @DrukmanJake.