Muslim mob burns man to death in Nigerian capital – police

This file photo shows a view of the central mosque in Jos, central Nigeria. A Muslim mob burned a vigilante in the Nigerian capital on Saturday (Sunday in Manila) after a row with a cleric rallied his supporters against the man, police said. AFP PHOTO

Abuja, Nigeria: A Muslim mob burned a vigilante in the Nigerian capital on Saturday (Sunday in Manila) after a row with a cleric rallied his supporters against the man, police said.

It was not immediately clear whether the killing in the Lugbe area of ​​Abuja was linked to blasphemy which has recently fueled religious tensions in Nigeria.

Police in the capital said in a statement that a 30-year-old vigilante, Ahmad Usman, “got into an argument with a cleric (malam) whose name is still unknown in the same area”.

He said “the heated argument escalated into a violent outbreak which led to the murder and burning of Ahmad Usman by the enraged mob mobilized by the clergy, numbering around 200”.

Police said order had been restored to the area.

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Blasphemy runs high in Africa’s most populous nation, which is almost evenly divided between the predominantly Christian south and the predominantly Muslim north. Inter-community tensions often erupt.

A mob set fire to homes and shops in northern Bauchi state last month, following “a blasphemous message posted on social media by a certain Rhoda Jatau”, the spokesperson said. of the local police, Ahmed Mohammed Wakili.

The incident came days after Deborah Samuel, a Christian student from the northern city of Sokoto, was stoned to death and her body burned by Muslim students after posting on social media what they considered it an insult to the Prophet.

Four days later, hundreds of Muslims demonstrated in the northeastern city of Maiduguri, lighting bonfires in the streets, calling for the death of a Christian woman for an allegedly blasphemous online post.

Blasphemy carries the death penalty under Sharia, which operates alongside common law in northern Nigeria. But in some cases, the accused are killed by mobs without legal process.